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Underground Film Links: December 2, 2012

Poster for the classic horror movie The Wasp Woman

So, recently, I’ve gone from skipping links posts to having these posts be the only thing I’m updating on the site lately. That’s due to having a bit of a crisis of where to go from this point forward, plus I’ve been hit up with a few freelance projects for clients lately — which is a good thing for me personally, but a bad thing for people who enjoy this site as my time is being eaten up. Anyway, here’s this week’s (brief) list. Hmmm, perhaps others are in the same boat and not blogging as much…

  1. Electric Sheep examines the little-examined sub-genre of sci-fi “monster women” movies, such as The Wasp Woman, which has the best poster of a creature not actually seen the film. And in related reading matter, they also review the new book House of Psychotic Women: An Autobiographical Topography of Female Neurosis in Horror and Exploitation Films by Kier-La Janisse.
  2. Congrats to Canyon Cinema for receiving a Southern Exposure Alternative Exposure Grant that will go towards reviving their legendary Cinemanews zine.
  3. Bill Plympton rags on Wes Anderson’s latest, Moonrise Kingdom, which I haven’t watched yet, but I get where Bill’s coming from.
  4. Temple of Schlock attempts to understand the lost art of streaking.
  5. Anthology Film Archives reveals the mystery of the most seen woman in film: The China girl.
  6. What do the first films by John Carpenter and Monte Hellman have in common? Padding.
  7. Not Underground: David Bordwell has an interesting analysis of the TV directing work of Tim Hunter. Of particular interest is Hunter’s “artiness” of directing Twin Peaks.
  8. You really don’t have to click on this one, but the crankier side of me wants to point out that there are never any “surprises” at the Spirit Awards.

Underground Film Feedback (1 comment)

  • Chris says:

    I really disagree with Plympton. No talent? I think reactions to different styles of filmmaking are of course subjective. But I get a lot out of Wes Anderson’s films. I sometimes think the quirkiness obscures the actual feeling/emotional resonance. But to say there’s no talent there? That seems like it’s going a bit overboard.

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