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Underground Film Links: August 1, 2010

  1. Self-serving link first again: My latest index-y type project on the Underground Film Journal is the DVD Underground, a list of DVDs and DVD box sets of classic underground films. This is part of my timeline project. So, please check it out. But, more importantly, check these out:
  2. Here’s a fantastic interview you have to read: Miss Rosen chats with filmmaker, photographer, exhibitor and general all around underground troublemaker Anton Perich. Plus, the piece is illustraed with Perich’s wonderful B&W pictures of Candy Darling, Robert Mapplethorpe and Andrea Feldman, a.k.a. Andrea Whips.
  3. Can you identify the filmmaker in the photo at this groovy ’60s San Francisco Country Joe and the Fish performance? Seriously, the blogger over there wants to know.
  4. Making Light of It has some very cool stills from Philippe Grandrieux’s La Vie Nouvelle, that appears to be some sort of homage to Wavelength or something. You can read more on the film on Kinoeye, which also makes it seems like the stills MLoI grabbed are the calmest of the film. Plus, MLoI opens up the debate about Brakhage on Blu-Ray.
  5. I haven’t heard of this film before, but the website for the video store Video Station says they now have a copy of What’s Underground About Marshmallows?, a filmed performance of a piece by Jack Smith that’s a very angry rant against Jonas Mekas following the whole Flaming Creatures debacle. Facets put the DVD out in May.
  6. Speaking of Facets, Gregory Hess offers a paean to VHS on their blog. Is VHS to cinema what vinyl is to music?
  7. Another paean: This time to small-town art house theaters by donna k. We all have our favorites and favorite memories, don’t we?
  8. File this one under “I can’t believe it”: City.com reports that 20 people watched all 8 hours and more of Andy Warhol’s Empire at the Anthology Film Archives. Twenty? I would have expected like 5 to make it. Although, that’s a challenge I’d like to take myself someday.
  9. Jessica Oreck, director of the fabulous documentary Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo, is already hard at work on her new film The Vanquishing of the Witch Baba Yaga, for which she’s on location in Poland. She’s already posted up a bunch of great location pictures and video.
  10. Jonas Mekas has absolutely fabulous pictures of a visit to his hometown of Semeniškiai.
  11. DINCA alerts us to a Flickr gallery of the Refresh show at the Axiom Center for New and Experimental Media that includes work by artists such as Clint Enns and DINCA’s own Andrew Rosinski. Plus, three frames from Chris Marker’s Sans Soleil (1983).
  12. Is Serbian Movie the depraved and defiled masterpiece some people are calling it? The Phantom of Pulp checks it out and says no, but says its still worth watching. Plus, Phantom sees what all the fuss is all about the controversial indie film The Killer Inside Me.
  13. The B Movie Celebration has a fun interview with Troma honcho Lloyd Kaufman. Hey, what interview with Uncle Lloyd isn’t fun?
  14. Bob Moricz reiterates: Nicholas Ray kicks ass.
  15. Artist Petra Stefankova has made a funky, abstract portrait of Jonas Mekas, along with a gushing story about meeting the godfather of the underground.
  16. Bill Plympton sounds and looks like he had a great time at Comic-Con this year.
  17. J. J. Murphy goes almost mainstream with us with a solid review of current indie darling The Kids Are All Right. As always, he provides invaluable insight I haven’t read in other reviews.
  18. Not film: Underground journalist Jack Sargeant takes a pretty photo of the smoke that choked his city recently.
  19. John R. Hand’s The Synthetic Man plows onward: Day 7 stills.
  20. Now I know why Landscape Suicide has been hanging out with nature so much, heading into his seventh forest and looking into his 15th distance. It’s because civilization sucks.
  21. Curator extraordinaire Andrea Grover visits the Freeport Historical Museum and takes lots of photos of old photos.
  22. Way not underground, but I like it: A. O. Scott examines the new Internet era of criticizing the critics, specifically based around Christopher Nolan’s Inception. By the way, did you know if I just type the words Christopher Nolan’s Inception here that my hits on this post will rise exponentially? I find the discourse that Scott describes to be phenomenally bizarre.

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