Underground Film Journal

Online Cinema

Watch great videos collected from all over the Internet, including movie trailers, short films, interviews, film festival trailers and other random stuff related to underground cinema.

Articles:

And Sometimes The Boats Are Low — Leighton Pierce
And Sometimes the Boats Are Low by Leighton Pierce (1983) As of this writing, there does not appear to be much written about this particular film by Pierce, even though there is quite a bit written about his work in general, particularly by film historian Scott MacDonald. Two known screenings of the film have been… Read More…
She Had Her Gun All Ready — Vivienne Dick
She Had Her Gun All Ready By Vivienne Dick (1978). This is the second film by Vivienne Dick and the first one that included a plot and actresses playing roles. Her first film was Guerillere Talks (1978), a collection of filmed portraits of female punk musicians, including Lydia Lunch and Pat Place, both of whom… Read More…
Happy 95th Birthday, Jonas Mekas!
Happy Birthday to Jonas Mekas! Who turns 95 today! From humble beginnings in a small Lithuanian town, to escaping the Nazis, to arriving in New York City in 1948 to become a champion of the cinema! At first hesitant about the then burgeoning American avant-garde, Mekas would become it’s biggest supporter: Publishing Film Culture magazine,… Read More…
Remedial Reading Comprehension — George Landow
Remedial Reading Comprehension by George Landow (1971). Although P. Adams Sitney‘s Visionary Film gives a completion year of the film of 1971, an on-screen copyright notice gives the year as 1970. Most references to Remedial Reading Comprehension discuss the autobiographical nature of the film. In an article about autobiography in experimental filmmaking in The Avant-Garde… Read More…
Breathdeath — Stan Vanderbeek
Breathdeath by Stan Vanderbeek (1963). At the EXPRMNTL 3 film competition at Knokke-le-Zoute, Belgium in 1963, Breathdeath tied for 2nd place with Gregory Markopoulos‘s Twice a Man. Both men took home $2,000 in prize money. In An Introduction to the American Underground Film, Sheldon Renan classifies Breathdeath as a “protest film,” which was a minority… Read More…
Andy Warhol — Marie Menken
Andy Warhol by Marie Menken. Competed 1965. Marie Menken made several films inspired by and starring artists she knew, such as Visual Variations on Noguchi (1945) and Arabesque for Kenneth Anger (1961). According to Warhol’s memoir Popism: The Warhol Sixties (written with Pat Hackett), in 1963 Warhol was brought by his friend Charles Henri Ford… Read More…
Jammin’ The Blues — Gjon Mili
Jammin’ the Blues by Gjon Mili. Completed in 1944. Gjon Mili is primarily known for his work as a photographer, particularly his portraits and experimental use of strobe lighting, much of which appeared in Life magazine. In the book Norman Granz: The Man Who Used Jazz for Justice, author Tad Hershorn goes into great detail in… Read More…
Slippery Jim — Ferdinand Zecca
Slippery Jim by Ferdinand Zecca. The completion/release year of Slippery Jim varies among sources. The catalog for the 1947 Art in Cinema program dates the film as circa 1906. However, Richard Abel, a silent movie historian, gives two dates for the film. First, in his The Ciné Goes to Town: French Cinema, 1896-1914 (published 1998),… Read More…
Quixote — Bruce Baillie
Quixote by Bruce Baillie. Finished most likely in 1965, but sources place year range 1964-1967. In Visionary Film, P. Adams Sitney says the film was “revised” in 1967; while in his “Movie Journal” column, Jonas Mekas wrote that the “final version” of Quixote was screened in New York City in 1968. An article in the… Read More…
Sunday — Dan Drasin
Sunday by Dan Drasin. Shot and completed in 1961. According to the filmmaker, the film was shot entirely in 16mm B&W on April 9, 1961, capturing a protest made by folk singers in New York City’s Washington Square Park that was challenged by police officers. In 2008, the film was restored by the UCLA Film… Read More…